Mustard & Lemon Glazed Pork

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Marinate pork for 2 hours prior to preparation.

This is something I whipped up for my friends yesterday for lunch.

-1/4 cup dijon mustard

-1/4 cup whole-grain mustard

-finely grated zest of 1 lemon

-1 tablespoon chopped thyme

-1 tablespoon unsalted butter, softened

-one 3 pound boneless pork loin, trimmed of all fat

-salt and freshly ground pepper

-1 pound baby carrots, peeled

-16 large shallots, peeled

-1/2 cup dry white wine

-12 garlic cloves, unpeeled

-1/4 teaspoon crushed red pepper

-1 1/4 cups chicken stock or low sodium broth

-2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil

-1 tablespoon sherry vinegar

In a small bowl, whisk the dijon and whole-grain mustards with the grated lemon zest, thyme and butter. Set 2 tablespoons of the mustard mixture aside. Season the pork with salt and pepper and spread the rest of the mustard mixture all over it. Let stand at room temperature for 2 hours or refrgierate overnight.

Preheat oven to 350. In a medium saucepan of boiling salted water, blanch the carrots for 2 minutes. Using slotted spoon, ttransfer carrots to a bowl. Add the shallots to the saucepan and cook for 4 minutes. Drain and hlave the shallots lengthwise and add to the carrots. Add the wine, garlic, crushed red pepper, 1/4 cup of the stock and 1 tablespoon of the olive oil to the vegetables and toss well. Spread the vegetables around the dge of the shallow roasting pan, setting the shallots cut side down. Leave enough room in the center for the pork.

In a large nonstick skille, heat the remaining 1 tablespoon of olive oil. Add the pork loin and cook over moderately high heat until browned 2 sides, about 6 minutes total. Nestle the pork in the vegetables and roast for about 45 minutes. Tuen the pan 180 degrees, add 1/2 cup of the stock and roast for about 20 minutes longer, until an instant-read thermometer inserted into the thickest part of the meat reads 140 degrees.

Transfer the pork to a board. Roast the vegetables on the bottom of the shelf for 15 minutes longer, until very tender; transfer to a bowl and keep warm. Set the roasting pan over moderately high heat, add the remaining 1/2 cup of stock and simmer for about 1 minute, scrpaing up the browned bits. add the vinegar and bring to a simmer. Off the heat, whisk in the reserved two tablespoons of mustard and season with salt and pepper. Slice the pork and serve with the vegatables and sauce.

I, personally, paired this meal with a dry Chenin Blanc, but feel free to use a French Chardonnay if you prefer that.

What do you think, CorkDork?

It's pretty good. biggrin.gif

You're Welcome!

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Posted · Report post

Marinate pork for 2 hours prior to preparation.

This is something I whipped up for my friends yesterday for lunch.

-1/4 cup dijon mustard

-1/4 cup whole-grain mustard

-finely grated zest of 1 lemon

-1 tablespoon chopped thyme

-1 tablespoon unsalted butter, softened

-one 3 pound boneless pork loin, trimmed of all fat

-salt and freshly ground pepper

-1 pound baby carrots, peeled

-16 large shallots, peeled

-1/2 cup dry white wine

-12 garlic cloves, unpeeled

-1/4 teaspoon crushed red pepper

-1 1/4 cups chicken stock or low sodium broth

-2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil

-1 tablespoon sherry vinegar

In a small bowl, whisk the dijon and whole-grain mustards with the grated lemon zest, thyme and butter. Set 2 tablespoons of the mustard mixture aside. Season the pork with salt and pepper and spread the rest of the mustard mixture all over it. Let stand at room temperature for 2 hours or refrgierate overnight.

Preheat oven to 350. In a medium saucepan of boiling salted water, blanch the carrots for 2 minutes. Using slotted spoon, ttransfer carrots to a bowl. Add the shallots to the saucepan and cook for 4 minutes. Drain and hlave the shallots lengthwise and add to the carrots. Add the wine, garlic, crushed red pepper, 1/4 cup of the stock and 1 tablespoon of the olive oil to the vegetables and toss well. Spread the vegetables around the dge of the shallow roasting pan, setting the shallots cut side down. Leave enough room in the center for the pork.

In a large nonstick skille, heat the remaining 1 tablespoon of olive oil. Add the pork loin and cook over moderately high heat until browned 2 sides, about 6 minutes total. Nestle the pork in the vegetables and roast for about 45 minutes. Tuen the pan 180 degrees, add 1/2 cup of the stock and roast for about 20 minutes longer, until an instant-read thermometer inserted into the thickest part of the meat reads 140 degrees.

Transfer the pork to a board. Roast the vegetables on the bottom of the shelf for 15 minutes longer, until very tender; transfer to a bowl and keep warm. Set the roasting pan over moderately high heat, add the remaining 1/2 cup of stock and simmer for about 1 minute, scrpaing up the browned bits. add the vinegar and bring to a simmer. Off the heat, whisk in the reserved two tablespoons of mustard and season with salt and pepper. Slice the pork and serve with the vegatables and sauce.

I, personally, paired this meal with a dry Chenin Blanc, but feel free to use a French Chardonnay if you prefer that.

What do you think, CorkDork?

It's pretty good. biggrin.gif

You're Welcome!

Trim off all the fat? ... thats a pork loin there boyeee whats the matter with you?

I bet you put A-1 on your steak also.

DAMN dry.gif

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Trim off all the fat? ... thats a pork loin there boyeee whats the matter with you?

I bet you put A-1 on your steak also.

DAMN dry.gif

I treat my body with the utmost of respect, dignity, and Functional-Atlas-sculptations.

Trim the fat and leave the body.

And, Phro, A-1 is for pansies. I wouldn't put A-1 on my worst enemy's steak. mad.gif

AND, don't be hijacking my thread!

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AND, don't be hijacking my thread!

yea that is my job! laugh.gif pork fat is good for you!

let me tell you a short story about pig fat

Streak o' lean" is my favorite name for fatback it has some meat still attached. and is still popular in many areas, particularly the Southeastern United States where it is typically cooked in the same manner as regular fatback. It has a much higher meat content, as much as 50% by volume, and is typically salt cured and sold in small blocks that can be cut and fried or used in other dishes. It resembles regular bacon in many respects, including the marbling of meat and fat, although it is typically sold in smaller blocks. Like many cured pork products, it is typically very high in sodium due to the salt content

Fatback is an important element of traditional charcuterie. In several European cultures it is used to make specialty bacon. Containing no skeletal muscle, this bacon is a delicacy.

At one time fatback was Italy's basic cooking fat, especially in regions where olive trees are sparse or absent, but health concerns have reduced its popularity. However, it provides a rich, authentic flavour for the classic battuto – sautéed vegetables, herbs and flavourings – that forms the basis of many traditional dishes. Nowadays, pancetta is often used instead

Fatback is processed into slab bacon by many methods, including brine curing, dry curing, smoking, or boiling. Usually the skin (rind) is left on.

This fatback bacon is widely eaten throughout Europe. In Polish, it is called boczek, since it comes from the side of the pig and has long been a key component of bigos. In Italy it is called lardo, and a notable example is Valle d'Aosta Lard d'Arnad. In Ukraine, Russia, and other Russian-speaking areas of the former Soviet Union, it is called salo. In Hungary, where it is called szalonna, it is very popular for campfire cookouts (szalonnasütés). In Germany, where it is called Rückenspeck (back pork fat), it is one of two cuts known as Speck (cold smoked ham, made from the hind leg of pork).

Fatback is a traditional part of southern US cuisine and soul food, where it is used for fried pork rinds (known there as cracklings), and to flavor stewed vegetables such as greens and black-eyed peas. A common delicacy is strips of heavily salted and fried fatback. Fatback was extremely popular in the South during the Great Depression because it is an inexpensive piece of meat.[citation needed] In the southwestern United States, fried fatback is known by its Spanish name, chicharrón.

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yea that is my job! laugh.gif pork fat is good for you!

let me tell you a short story about pig fat

Streak o' lean" is my favorite name for fatback it has some meat still attached. and is still popular in many areas, particularly the Southeastern United States where it is typically cooked in the same manner as regular fatback. It has a much higher meat content, as much as 50% by volume, and is typically salt cured and sold in small blocks that can be cut and fried or used in other dishes. It resembles regular bacon in many respects, including the marbling of meat and fat, although it is typically sold in smaller blocks. Like many cured pork products, it is typically very high in sodium due to the salt content

Fatback is an important element of traditional charcuterie. In several European cultures it is used to make specialty bacon. Containing no skeletal muscle, this bacon is a delicacy.

At one time fatback was Italy's basic cooking fat, especially in regions where olive trees are sparse or absent, but health concerns have reduced its popularity. However, it provides a rich, authentic flavour for the classic battuto – sautéed vegetables, herbs and flavourings – that forms the basis of many traditional dishes. Nowadays, pancetta is often used instead

Fatback is processed into slab bacon by many methods, including brine curing, dry curing, smoking, or boiling. Usually the skin (rind) is left on.

This fatback bacon is widely eaten throughout Europe. In Polish, it is called boczek, since it comes from the side of the pig and has long been a key component of bigos. In Italy it is called lardo, and a notable example is Valle d'Aosta Lard d'Arnad. In Ukraine, Russia, and other Russian-speaking areas of the former Soviet Union, it is called salo. In Hungary, where it is called szalonna, it is very popular for campfire cookouts (szalonnasütés). In Germany, where it is called Rückenspeck (back pork fat), it is one of two cuts known as Speck (cold smoked ham, made from the hind leg of pork).

Fatback is a traditional part of southern US cuisine and soul food, where it is used for fried pork rinds (known there as cracklings), and to flavor stewed vegetables such as greens and black-eyed peas. A common delicacy is strips of heavily salted and fried fatback. Fatback was extremely popular in the South during the Great Depression because it is an inexpensive piece of meat.[citation needed] In the southwestern United States, fried fatback is known by its Spanish name, chicharrón.

You didn't tell me anything, Cap'n Shortcomings. You cut and pasted again. I bet the right button on your mouse hates you. laugh.gif

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I bet the right button on your mouse hates you. laugh.gif

i use ctrl c and v laugh.gif my mouse love me!

user posted image

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