Barber Shop to close after 80 years

6 posts in this topic

Posted · Report post

This is the last straw as far as having any hope that this new shopping center owner is worth a damn.  Business after business either leaves or never even opens, yet this guy doesn't seem/want to get it.  My sense is that his plan is no different than Jabba the Hutt which is run the place at a loss for write offs, do the bare minimum, and care less what anyone thinks about it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

x

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

The barbershop said they've been losing money for years. They would have eventually gone out of business even if the shopping center owner didn't raise rates.

I'd also be interested to know actual dollar values he was paying before and after the increase, especially compared to other retail spots in the area. I certainly can't make any judgement calls about whether the rate increase is appropriate without knowing these things. Gun to my head, I'm guessing the barbershop was getting a below-market rate for years. Can anyone actually say for sure, or is everyone just passing judgment based on assumptions?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

The shop’s landlord said he needed to raise rent in order to afford a backlog of maintenance issues, and he said another barber shop plans to rent out the space.

This landlord bills himself as a turn-around artist, saving failing shopping malls.  I'm no expert, but tripling the rent on an 80 year tenant to pay for maintenance does not sound like a good technique for accomplishing this.  Remember the Butt Shack left because this. landlord. did. not. fix. anything.  However if another barber shop does rent that space soon, Bryan's comment on rates might be valid...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

I'd like to say some good words about the Greenhills Barber Shop.

I received my first hair cut at the barber shop when I was 1.5 years old (1972). I still have the piece of hair that was cut off my head by Millie. Ray was employed and I soon shifted one seat to my right and had my hair cut by him until about 1999 when nature really began to win and I decided to just shave it off for good. Ray and Millie have been the only people to have had cut my hair.

But, the tradition didn't start with me. My grandfather starting go there in the late 1950's. My grandmother had her hair cut by Millie. Then, both my father and his brother started going there after my father and mother moved into Greenhills in the mid 1960's on Burley Circle. My father worked at Willie and Kraus Engineering which was the location above the once UDF - above the old PNC Bank. My brothers all went there and only for a short time did my mother go there. She started to go to what had become the new Salon on the other end of the shopping center.

My family had GREAT times at the barber shop. Looking at the dog pictures on the wall, reading magazines, and talking about school with Ray and Al, and Tom was a true pleasure. The vacuum hoses after a hair cut were epic. Nothing kept Ray from targeting my neck and watching me slink to the floor with a snake-like wiggle of laughter. I want to say that part of my life - or my social upbringings took place in one of those chairs. I learned a lot from all of the barbers not by talking, but by listening. There were a lot of stories AND WKRC-550 in that place. The radio will never die in those walls - "If walls could talk."

Both of my sons first hair cuts were by Ray. we still have those locks of hair and a picture to remember it by. Propped up in that gray metal barber high chair was the very one I sat in some 30 years prior. So, four generations pass through and the memories are epic.

The place will be missed. But, most of all will be the people, not the store. You can build any kind of store you want. You can put great fixtures in it, fancy chairs, gold combs and expensive clippers. But, the best part of anything like a place like you come to visit for four generations is because of the PEOPLE. People like those in that barber shop cannot and will not (at least by me) be forgotten.

One last story in case he reads this or hears about him from someone else: I was 16 years old and headed into the barber shop. I sat down with Ray to get my hair cut. About halfway through Ray spins me around to cut the back of my hair. Officer Zettler (very-long-time family friends) comes in and cuffs me to the chair and leaves. With the hair cut completed and Office Zettler nowhere in site I just sat there as Ray tried to put lipstick on me like he had "always" tried to do when I was much younger.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now